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Palmar and plantar pads and flexion creases of genetic polydactyly mice ( Pdn

Kimura, Sumiko ; Naruse, Ichiro ; Schaumann, Blanka A. ; Plato, Chris C. ; Shimada, Masahisa ; Shiota, Kohei

Journal of Morphology, January 1999, Vol.239(1), pp.87-96 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Palmar and plantar pads and flexion creases of genetic polydactyly mice ( Pdn
  • Author: Kimura, Sumiko ; Naruse, Ichiro ; Schaumann, Blanka A. ; Plato, Chris C. ; Shimada, Masahisa ; Shiota, Kohei
  • Description: Attempts to gain a better understanding of the relationship between the epidermal ridge patterns (dermatoglyphics) and flexion creases on the volar aspects of human hands and feet and specific medical disorders led to a search for a suitable animal model, allowing studies of the fetal development of the pertinent structures. A common experimental animal, the rat (), was found to be an excellent candidate, owing to the strong resemblance of the volar pads and flexion creases on its palmar and plantar surfaces to those of human subjects. A hereditary preaxial polydactyly mouse () provides an opportunity to study the effects of this malformation on the surrounding morphological structures and, specifically, on the volar pads, i.e., the sites over which the dermatoglyphic patterns develop. The hands and feet of the wild‐type () mice show no anomalies, and their major pad and flexion crease configurations correspond to those of normal rats. The heterozygous () mice, in spite of having a thumb/big toe with a duplicated distal phalanx on their hands/feet, did not display any alterations in palmar/plantar pads. The homozygous () mice have a protrusion in the thenar area and one to three supernumerary digits on the preaxial portion of both the hands and feet. The effect of these anomalies was found to be limited to the pad and flexion crease configurations in the preaxial areas; the postaxial sites were not affected. The original number of pads on the thenar/first interdigital areas of mice was apparently identical to that of the and mice. The preaxial protrusion, however, affected the number, size, and location of the pads observed in the newborn mice, resulting in varying pad configurations, such as fused and scattered pads or a pad cluster formed by gathering the neighboring pads. These pad modifications were induced by the preaxial plantar/palmar protrusion only and were not affected by the presence of supernumerary preaxial digits. In view of the similarities in the morphology and fetal development of human and mouse distal limbs, the present study is relevant to human subjects, particularly to the understanding of the significance of dermatoglyphic variations in individuals with specific medical disorders. Future studies of naturally occurring or experimentally induced limb malformations in mice or rats should provide valuable insights into the development of human hands and feet and into factors contributing to their congenital anomalies. J. Morphol. 239:87–96, 1999. © 1999 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
  • Is Part Of: Journal of Morphology, January 1999, Vol.239(1), pp.87-96
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0362-2525 ; E-ISSN: 1097-4687 ; DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-4687(199901)239:1<87::AID-JMOR6>3.0.CO;2-5
  • Subjects: Polydactyly ; Pads ; Flexion Creases ; Mouse
  • Language: English
  • Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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