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A Vision Lost Dr. Robert J. Preston and the Southwestern Lunatic Asylum, 1887-1906

Cavender, Anthony

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 2014, Vol.122(3), pp.202-229 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    A Vision Lost Dr. Robert J. Preston and the Southwestern Lunatic Asylum, 1887-1906
  • Author: Cavender, Anthony
  • Description: To be sure, some of the features of psychiatric care installed by Eastern superintendents John Minson Galt, Alexander Galt, and John Minson Galt III evinced the then new moral treatment therapeutic program-for example, minimal use of physical restraints, respect for patients, and work therapy-that later became the standard in American asylums, but moral treatment originated in England and France, and its first genuine manifestation in the United States appeared in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.1 Because of overcrowding, the languishing of the insane in jails and almshouses, and the logistical problems attending the transport of patients from the western part of the state, Virginia established a second institution, Western Lunatic Asylum, in 1828 in Staunton. Many of the principles of moral treatment remain in practice today in various mental health care settings: treatment of the mentally ill with dignity and respect; provision of a safe, supportive, and caring environment;...
  • Is Part Of: The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 2014, Vol.122(3), pp.202-229
  • Identifier: ISSN: 00426636 ; E-ISSN: 19404050
  • Subjects: Virginia ; United States–Us ; Mental Disorders ; Physicians ; Eyes & Eyesight ; Studies ; Family Physicians ; Mental Health Care ; Physical Restraints ; Schizophrenia ; Therapy ; Patients
  • Language: English

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