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The Development of Ethics : A Historical and Critical Study

Irwin, Terence

2009

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  • Title:
    The Development of Ethics : A Historical and Critical Study
  • Author: Irwin, Terence
  • Description: This is the third of three volumes which together comprise a selective historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy. Here Terence Irwin covers the period from the late 18th to the late 20th century, with illuminating discussion of the Kantian tradition, utilitarianism, intuitionism, naturalism, idealism, and non-cognitivism..
    Contents -- Abbreviations -- 66. Kant: Practical Laws -- 894. Strategy in Theoretical and Practical Philosophy -- 895. Kant and Rationalism -- 896. Kant and Sentimentalism -- 897. Kant and Naturalism -- 898. Meta-Ethical Consequences of Kant’s Strategy -- 899. Normative Consequences -- 900. Kant’s Tasks -- 901. Form and Matter -- 902. Practical Laws and Objective Ends -- 903. Practical Laws and Categorical Imperatives -- 904. Happiness and Desire -- 905. Inclinations and Reasons -- 906. The Status of Hypothetical Imperatives -- 907. Self-Interest as a Source of Self-Love and Self-Conceit -- 908. External Reasons and Universal Laws -- 909. Happiness and the Highest Good -- 910. Are There Practical Laws of Prudence? -- 911. Practical Laws: A Dilemma for Kant -- 67. Kant: From Practical Laws to Morality -- 912. The Good Will -- 913. Praise, Blame, and Morality -- 914. Acting from Duty -- 915. The Scope of Moral Reasons -- 916. The A Priori Character of Moral Principles -- 917. The Idea and the Formulae of the Categorical Imperative -- 918. Universal Law -- 919. Rational Wills and Universal Law -- 920. The Formula of Humanity -- 921. Rational Beings as Objective Ends -- 922. The Objective End and the Formula of Humanity -- 923. How Can We Treat Rational Beings as Ends in Themselves? -- 924. Humanity v. Personality -- 925. The End-in-Itself and the Categorical Imperative -- 68. Kant: Some Objections and Replies -- 926. ‘Spurious Principles of Morality’ -- 927. The Errors of Sentimentalism -- 928. Morality and Non-Rational Motives -- 929. Kant and Aristotle on Non-Rational Motives -- 930. The Positive Role of Non-Rational Motives -- 931. Objections to Rationalism -- 932. Action and Virtue -- 933. Duty, Law, and Virtue -- 934. Objections to Traditional Naturalism -- 935. The Final Good and Moral Rightness -- 936. Differences Among the Ancients -- 937. Naturalism, Eudaemonism, and Perfectionism -- 938. The Significance of Naturalism for Kant’s Argument -- 69. Kant: Freedom -- 939. How can Freedom Justify Morality? The Fact of Reason -- 940. Free Will, Practical Law, and Moral Law -- 941. What does the Moral Law Reveal? -- 942. Practical Reason and Practical Freedom -- 943. Negative and Positive Freedom -- 944. Degrees of Autonomy and Heteronomy -- 945. Autonomy, Prudence, and Morality -- 946. Why Should We Be Autonomous? -- 947. Morality and Personality -- 948. From Practical Freedom to Transcendental Freedom -- 949. Objections to Kant’s Argument -- 950. Phenomena and Noumena -- 951. The Noumenal and the Practical -- 952. Kant’s Solution -- 953. Does Morality Require Noumenal Freedom? -- 954. An Unsuccessful Defence of Freedom and Morality -- 955. Negative and Positive Freedom v. Indeterminism -- 956. Transcendental Idealism v. Voluntarism -- 70. Kant: From Freedom to Morality -- 957. Does Autonomy Require Morality? -- 958. Mutual Respect and the Predisposition to Personality -- 959. Practical Reason and the Harmony of Ends -- 960. Treating Persons as En.
    ds: What Needs to be Proved -- 961. First Argument from Freedom to Morality: Respect for Oneself and for Others -- 962. Second Argument from Freedom to Morality: Non-Egocentric Reasons -- 963. Significance of the Argument about Non-Egocentric Reasons -- 964. Third Argument from Freedom to Morality: Extension of Practical Reason -- 965. Treating Persons as Ends and the Basis of Morality -- 966. The Effect of the Moral Law on the Non-Moral Self -- 967. Some Moral Implications -- 71. Kant: Morality and the Good -- 968. Autonomy and Kantian Morality -- 969. Is Naturalism Compatible with Autonomy? -- 970. The Errors of Eudaemonism about the Role of the Highest Good -- 971. Kant v. Eudaemonism: The Priority of the Right to the Good -- 972. Kant v. Eudaemonism: Holism and Justification -- 973. How Traditional Naturalism Might Support Kant -- 974. Elements of the Highest Good -- 975. The Antinomy of Practical Reason -- 976. Why Must We Aim at the Highest Good? -- 977. Why Must We Be Able to Achieve the Highest Good? -- 978. Morality, History, and God -- 979. The Highest Good and the Existence of God -- 980. Practical Faith -- 72. Kant: Meta-Ethical Questions -- 981. Some Meta-Ethical Implications of Kant’s Normative Theory -- 982. Naturalism v. Transcendental Idealism -- 983. Knowledge and Passivity -- 984. Conditions for Autonomy: Law and Nature -- 985. Aspects and Degrees of Autonomy -- 986. Autonomy and Independent Judgment -- 987. The Author of the Law v. the Author of the Obligation -- 988. Laws, Imperatives, and Legislation -- 989. Autonomy Without Legislation? -- 990. Kant’s View of Disputes About Natural Law -- 991. Autonomy Without Construction -- 992. Heteronomy and the Spurious Principles of Morality -- 993. Kantian Constructivism -- 994. Does Autonomy Require Construction? -- 995. Objections to a Constructivist Account of Autonomy -- 996. A Constructivist Revision of Kant? -- 73. Hegel: History and Theory -- 997. Ethics and the History of Ethics -- 998. Normative Theory and Critical Morality -- 999. Critical Morality and Comprehension of the Actual -- 1000. Historical and Analytic Approaches to Morality -- 1001. Hegel and Idealist Moral Philosophy -- 1002. The Will and Freedom -- 1003. The Free Will and its Objects -- 1004. Content for the Free Will -- 1005. Classical Greek Ethics -- 1006. Moral Theory and Classical Greek Society -- 1007. Later Antiquity -- 1008. Ancient and Mediaeval -- 1009. Hegel’s Criticism of Eudaemonism -- 1010. Eudaemonism v. Freedom -- 1011. Doubts about Hegel on Eudaemonism -- 1012. Defences of Hegel on Eudaemonism -- 1013. Eudaemonism in Hegel’s Argument -- 74. Hegel: Morality and Beyond -- 1014. Hedonism -- 1015. Hedonism and Utility -- 1016. Hedonism and Practical Reason -- 1017. Utilitarianism and Civil Society -- 1018. From Abstract Right to Kantian Morality -- 1019. Morality within Abstract Right? -- 1020. Kant and Enlightenment -- 1021. The Emptiness of Kantian Morality -- 1022. Kantian Dualism and the Examina.
    tion of Motives -- 1023. Is Kantian Dualism Incoherent? -- 1024. Purpose and Success in Kantian Morality -- 1025. The Truth in Kantian Morality -- 1026. The Value of Hegel’s Criticism of Kant -- 1027. Primitive Ethical Life -- 1028. Conscious Ethical Life -- 1029. Subjective and Objective Elements of Ethical Life -- 1030. The Place of Critical Morality in Ethical Life -- 1031. Hegel and His Successors -- 75. Marx and Idealist Moral Theory -- 1032. Reactions to Hegel -- 1033. Difficulties in Hegel’s View of the State -- 1034. Marx’s Answer to Difficulties in Hegel -- 1035. Marx’s Rejection of Moral Criticism -- 1036. The Replacement of Morality? -- 1037. The Evils of Capitalism -- 1038. Capitalism and Human Nature -- 1039. The Moral Status of Marx’s Criticism -- 1040. Marx’s Vindication of Morality -- 1041. Aristotelian and Kantian Theories -- 1042. Marx, Kant, and History -- 76. Schopenhauer -- 1043. Schopenhauer and Kant -- 1044. Eudaemonism -- 1045. Moral Motivation -- 1046. Duty and Inclination -- 1047. Egoism and Morality -- 1048. Laws and Imperatives in Kant -- 1049. The Character of the Categorical Imperative -- 1050. Kant and Rationalism -- 1051. Self-Interest and the Formula of Universal Law -- 1052. The Formula of Humanity -- 1053. Kant’s Egoism and the Highest Good -- 1054. Sources of Egoism -- 1055. The Relevance of Compassion -- 1056. The Importance of Compassion -- 1057. Compassion and Metaphysics -- 1058. Metaphysical Objections to Morality -- 1059. Criticisms of Kant on Freedom -- 1060. Morality and Freedom -- 1061. Implications of Schopenhauer’s Views -- 77. Kierkegaard -- 1062. Different Conceptions of the Moral Point of View -- 1063. Morality and Reason -- 1064. The Imperative Aspect of Morality -- 1065. Freedom and the Ethical Outlook -- 1066. The Aesthetic Outlook -- 1067. Differences between Kierkegaard and Hume -- 1068. Similarities between Kierkegaard and Hume -- 1069. An Objection to Hume -- 1070. The Aesthetic Attitude v. Rational Prudence -- 1071. The Differences between the Aesthetic and the Ethical Outlook -- 1072. Aesthetic Agency and Despair -- 1073. Freedom -- 1074. The Ethical Outlook and Objectivity -- 1075. Does Ethical Agency Require Morality? -- 1076. How Are We Free to Choose Ourselves? -- 1077. How Kantian is Kierkegaard? -- 1078. Rejection of Pagan Virtue -- 1079. Inadequate Accounts of Faith -- 1080. Why Faith Suspends the Ethical -- 1081. Morality in the Light of Faith -- 1082. The Errors in Pagan Virtue -- 1083. Selfish Conceptions of Love -- 1084. Universal Love -- 1085. Questions about Kierkegaard’s Voluntarism -- 1086. Is Christian Love Absurd? -- 78. Nietzsche -- 1087. The Criticism of Morality -- 1088. Against Moral Facts -- 1089. Moral and Non-Moral Values -- 1090. Why a Historical Approach? -- 1091. The Social Origin of Morals -- 1092. Master Morality -- 1093. Slave Morality -- 1094. The Hellenic Outlook in the Culture of the Sophists -- 1095. The Un-Hellenic Outlook of Socrates and Plato -- 1096. .
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Publisher: Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Identifier: E-ISBN: 9780191571466 ; ISBN: 9780199571789
  • Subjects: Ethics -- History ; Philosophy
  • Language: English
  • Source: Ebook Central Perpetual and DDA titles (ProQuest)

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