skip to main content
Language:
Search Limited to: Search Limited to: Resource type Show Results with: Show Results with: Index

The Development of Ethics : A Historical and Critical Study - From Socrates to the Reformation

Irwin, Terence

2008

Full text available

View all versions
Citations Cited by
  • Title:
    The Development of Ethics : A Historical and Critical Study - From Socrates to the Reformation
  • Author: Irwin, Terence
  • Description: This is the second of three volumes which together comprise a selective historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy. This volume covers ethics from the 16th to the 18th century, and features illuminating discussion of such great thinkers as Suarez, Grotius, Hobbes, Hutcheson, Hume, Reid, Butler, and Rousseau..
    Intro -- Contents -- Abbreviations -- 30. Suarez: Law and Obligation -- 423. The Questions about Natural Law -- 424. Some Issues and Clarifications -- 425. Suarez’s ‘Intermediate’ Position -- 426. Naturalism -- 427. Two Versions of Naturalism -- 428. Suarez’s Objection to Naturalism -- 429. True Law -- 430. Obligation and the Natural Law -- 431. Conceptions of Obligation -- 432. Why Obligation Requires Laws and Commands -- 433. Obligations v. Duties -- 434. Obligation, Law, and Natural Law -- 435. Voluntarism -- 31. Suarez: Naturalism -- 436. The Natural Basis of Natural Law -- 437. The Foundation of Obligation -- 438. Moral Goodness -- 439. The Objectivity of Moral Goodness: An Argument for Naturalism -- 440. Metaphysics and Meta-ethics -- 441. Intrinsic Rightness -- 442. Theoretical and Practical Reason -- 443. Natural Rightness and Divine Freewill -- 444. Subordinate Principles of Natural Law -- 445. Our Knowledge of Natural Law -- 446. Application of the Precepts -- 447. Divine Dispensations from the Natural Law? -- 448. The Natural Law and the Law of Nations -- 449. Natural Law and the Basis of Political Society -- 450. The Law of War as Part of the Law of Nations -- 451. Sedition and Rebellion -- 452. The Separation of Morality from Natural Law -- 32. Natural Law and ‘Modern’ Moral Philosophy -- 453. The Modern Theory of Natural Law -- 454. Barbeyrac’s View of Grotius -- 455. The Fundamental Status of Natural Law -- 456. Sidgwick: A Jural Conception of Ethics -- 457. What is Distinctive of a Jural Conception? -- 458. Sidgwick and Barbeyrac -- 459. The Abandonment of Jural Morality? -- 460. Who Holds a Jural Conception? -- 461. Alleged Contrasts between Aquinas and Suarez -- 462. Grotius as a Secular Moralist -- 33. Grotius -- 463. Grotius and his Predecessors -- 464. Naturalism -- 465. The Will of God -- 466. Natural Sociality -- 467. Natural Law and Political Principles -- 468. Is Grotius a Pioneer? -- 34. Hobbes: Motives and Reasons -- 469. Hobbes’s Aims -- 470. Passion v. Will -- 471. Hobbes and Greek Scepticism -- 472. Objections to Hobbes’s Account of Will -- 473. Deliberation and Practical Reason -- 474. Conflicting Views on Incontinence -- 475. Will, Passion, and Freewill -- 476. A Hedonist Account of Desire and Emotion -- 477. Pleasure and Good -- 478. Practical Reason and Prudence -- 479. Pleasure, Reason, and the Human Good: Rejection of Eudaemonism -- 480. The Instability of Desire -- 481. Aristotelian Teleology -- 35. Hobbes: From Human Nature to Morality -- 482. Moral Philosophy, Old and New -- 483. Human Nature and Natural Law -- 484. Freedom and Rights -- 485. Obligation as Renunciation of Rights -- 486. Obligation as Motivation -- 487. Natural Law and Divine Commands -- 488. Why Moral Principles are Laws of Nature -- 489. The Reduction of Morality -- 490. The State of Nature -- 491. Competition and Conflict -- 492. Why a State of War? -- 493. Arguments for a Commonwealth -- 494. Objections to the Prudential Argument -- 495. .
    Prudence and Motivation in the State of Nature -- 496. Reason and the Laws of Nature -- 36. Hobbes: Morality -- 497. Hobbes’s Attitude to Morality -- 498. Hobbes’s Defence of Morality -- 499. Indirect Arguments for Morality -- 500. Morality and the Preservation of Peace -- 501. Revolutionary Objections -- 502. Libertarian Objections -- 503. Non-conformist Objections -- 504. Indirect Prudence -- 505. Psychology and Morality: The Presumption of Equality -- 506. Psychology and Morality: Risk and Reciprocity -- 507. Moral Theory in Hobbes’s System -- 37. Spinoza -- 508. Spinoza’s Attitude to Ethics -- 509. Mind and the Limits of Agency -- 510. Errors about Freedom -- 511. Intellect and Will -- 512. Emotion and Freedom from Emotion -- 513. Desires and Tendencies -- 514. Desire and Goodness -- 515. Passions as the Sources of Conflict -- 516. The Good of Rational Beings -- 517. Intellectual Love of God -- 518. Reason and the Good of Others -- 38. The ‘British Moralists’ -- 519. Rationalists and Sentimentalists -- 520. Whewell: Dependent v. Independent Morality -- 521. Whewell and Utilitarianism -- 522. Whewell on Voluntarism -- 523. Objections to Whewell: Utilitarianism -- 524. Appropriate Questions -- 525. The Significance of Voluntarism -- 526. Tendencies to Voluntarism -- 527. Anti-Scholasticism -- 528. Rationalism v. Orthodoxy -- 529. Voluntarism and Egoism -- 39. Cumberland and Maxwell -- 530. Cumberland’s Aims -- 531. Natural Law as Divine Legislation -- 532. Cumberland’s Voluntarism: Natural Law and Morality -- 533. Individual Happiness and the Common Good -- 534. Non-instrumental Goods v. Moral Goods -- 535. Utilitarianism? -- 536. Maxwell’s Criticism of Cumberland’s Account of Morality -- 537. Morality and its Sanction -- 538. Divine Goodness and the Stability of Morality -- 539. The Authority of Divine Legislation -- 540. Morality and Practical Reason -- 40. Cudworth -- 541. Cudworth’s Place in the History of Moral Philosophy -- 542. Reason and Will -- 543. The Hegemonicon -- 544. Does Cudworth Improve on the Scholastic View? -- 545. What is Cudworth’s Objection to Determinism? -- 546. The Nature of the Will and the Basis of Ethics -- 547. The Question about Immutability -- 548. Legislation and Morality -- 549. Cudworth and Plato -- 550. Cudworth and Hobbes -- 551. Obligation, Reason, and Motive -- 41. Locke and Natural Law -- 552. Disputes about Scholastic Naturalism -- 553. Locke, Hobbes, and Cudworth -- 554. Reason and Will -- 555. Freedom -- 556. Disputes on Natural Law -- 557. Sanderson -- 558. Culverwell and Suarez -- 559. Culverwell and the Character of Morality -- 560. Parker -- 561. Locke’s Voluntarist Account of Natural Law -- 562. Morality and Pleasure -- 563. A Return to Naturalism? -- 42. Pufendorf -- 564. Pufendorf on Morality and Law -- 565. Pufendorf’s Voluntarism -- 566. Nature, Creation, and Divine Freedom -- 567. Nature and Imposition -- 568. Natural v. Moral Goodness -- 569. Morality, Obligation, Law, and Command -- 570. Th.
    e Errors of Naturalism -- 571. Self-Interest v. Morality -- 572. Natural Goodness v. Natural Morality -- 573. Divine Law as a Source for Morality -- 574. The Form of Moral Requirements -- 575. The Authority of Divine Legislation -- 576. Pufendorf v. Hobbes on Legitimate Rulers -- 577. A Non-moral Basis for Morality? -- 578. Divine Commands as a Substitute for Morality -- 579. Grotius on Nature and Contradiction -- 580. Divine Freedom and Natural Goodness -- 581. What Sort of Voluntarist is Pufendorf? -- 582. Divine Freedom, Creation, and Legislation -- 583. Sociality and Society -- 584. The Limits of Sociality -- 585. Influence of Pufendorf -- 43. Leibniz: Naturalism and Eudaemonism -- 586. Scholasticism -- 587. The Reformation -- 588. Egoism and Eudaemonism -- 589. The Right and the Just -- 590. Naturalism v. Voluntarism -- 591. The Errors of Pufendorf’s Voluntarism -- 592. Pufendorf’s Legislative Account of Morality -- 593. Barbeyrac’s Defence of Pufendorf on the Content of Morality -- 594. God’s Right to Rule -- 595. Barbeyrac’s Objections to Eudaemonism -- 596. Barbeyrac’s Argument from Obligation -- 597. Leibniz v. Traditional Eudaemonism -- 44. Pufendorf and Natural Law -- 598. Barbeyrac’s Attempt to Assimilate Grotius to Pufendorf -- 599. Barbeyrac’s Attempt to Assimilate Pufendorf to Grotius -- 600. Barbeyrac’s Modern Theory of Natural Law -- 601. Burlamaqui on Pufendorf -- 602. A Defence of Voluntarism: Fundamental v. Formal Morality -- 603. What is Fundamental Morality? -- 604. Defence of Naturalism -- 605. The Persistence of Voluntarism -- 606. Mackie’s Defence of Pufendorf -- 607. Adams’s Defence of Pufendorf -- 45. Shaftesbury -- 608. Platonist, or Sentimentalist, or Both? -- 609. The Sense of Right and Wrong -- 610. Moral Motivation, Virtue, and Happiness -- 611. Platonism, Realism, and Voluntarism -- 612. Realism and the Irreducibility of Morality to Self-Interest -- 613. The Moral Sense as Support for Realism -- 614. The Moral Sense and Mutability -- 615. Shaftesbury as a Source of Sentimentalism and Realism -- 46. Clarke -- 616. Cudworth and Clarke -- 617. Natural Law and Obligation -- 618. Eternal Fitnesses -- 619. Clarke v. Naturalism -- 620. The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Eternal Fitnesses -- 621. The Content of Moral Judgments -- 622. Benevolence -- 623. Moral Principles and Motivation -- 624. Against Hobbes: Morality and the Right of Nature -- 625. Morality and Self-Preservation -- 626. Moral Obligations in the State of Nature -- 627. The Role of Self-Preservation in Morality -- 628. Prudential Obligation -- 629. Prudential Obligation and Hobbesian Motivation -- 630. The Significance of Clarke’s Criticism of Hobbes -- 631. Rationalism v. Naturalism in Clarke -- 47. Hutcheson: For and Against Moral Realism -- 632. Hutcheson’s Aims -- 633. Psychological Hedonism -- 634. Prudential Hedonism -- 635. Arguments for a Moral Sense: Against Egoism -- 636. Voluntarism and Divine Commands -- 637. Reason, Desire, and Action -- 638..
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Publisher: Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Identifier: E-ISBN: 9780191562402 ; ISBN: 9780199543274
  • Subjects: Ethics -- History ; Philosophy -- History
  • Language: English
  • Source: Ebook Central Perpetual and DDA titles (ProQuest)

Searching Remote Databases, Please Wait