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Non-neurological factors are implicated in impairments in gait and mobility among patients in a clinical dementia referral population

Thomas, Vince Salazar ; Vandenberg, Edward V ; Potter, Jane F

International journal of geriatric psychiatry, February 2002, Vol.17(2), pp.128-33 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Non-neurological factors are implicated in impairments in gait and mobility among patients in a clinical dementia referral population
  • Author: Thomas, Vince Salazar ; Vandenberg, Edward V ; Potter, Jane F
  • Description: Although gait abnormalities have been previously noted in dementia, their non-neurological correlates have not been examined. We used data on 900 consecutive outpatients assessed from 1994 to 1999 in the University of Nebraska Geriatric Assessment Clinic Data Base (UN-GAC) to examine the prevalence of gait disorders and the relationship of gait disorders to physical illness in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD dementia. Gait disorders were very prevalent at each level of cognitive function [58.7% for CDR=0, 68.0% for CDR=0.5, 57.9% for CDR=1, 68.1% for CDR=2 and 76.9% for CDR=3, p=0.02] and were more frequently observed in AD patients with poorer cognitive function. Among all demented patients, 45.0% of those without gait impairment were ADL independent compared to 11.8% of those with gait impairment. In adjusted logistic regression models, the presence of a gait disorder among AD patients was significantly associated with older age (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.09, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI)=1.04-1.15), special sensory (2.19, 1.17-4.12), and lower GI (3.57, 1.97-6.47) dysfunction. The prevalence of gait disorders is high in even mildly demented persons and associated with common and often treatable organ system dysfunction. Because gait disorders are also associated with a high prevalence of ambulatory disability, attention to co morbid illnesses implicated in gait impairment may reduce the burden of disability in this population.
  • Is Part Of: International journal of geriatric psychiatry, February 2002, Vol.17(2), pp.128-33
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0885-6230 ; PMID: 11813274 Version:1
  • Subjects: Geriatric Assessment ; Alzheimer Disease -- Diagnosis ; Gait Disorders, Neurologic -- Etiology
  • Language: English
  • Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)

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