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The future of assisted suicide and euthanasia

Neil M. Gorsuch (Neil McGill), 1967-

c2006

Available at UDM McNichols Campus Library  UDM McNichols Library Stacks  (R 726 .G65 2006 )()

  • Title:
    The future of assisted suicide and euthanasia
  • Author: Neil M. Gorsuch (Neil McGill), 1967-
  • Description: 1. Introduction -- 2. The Glucksberg and quill controversies : the judiciary's (non)resolution of the assisted suicide debate -- 2.1. The Washington due process litigation -- 2.2. The New York equal protection litigation -- 2.3. The final battle? : the Supreme Court does (and does not) decide -- 2.4. The aftermath of Glucksberg and Quill -- 3. The debate over history -- 3.1. Which history? -- 3.2. The project -- 3.3. The ancients -- 3.4. Early Christian history -- 3.5. English common law -- 3.6. Colonial American experience -- 3.7. The modern consensus on suicide and its assistance -- 3.8. The euthanasia movement -- 3.9. Prevailing law today -- 3.10. Conclusion -- 4. Arguments from fairness and equal protection : if a right to refuse, then a right to assisted suicide? -- 4.1. An act /omission distinction? -- 4.2. A causation-based distinction? -- 4.3. Toward an intent-based distinction : the insight of the double effect principle -- 4.4. Some (initial) arguments against double effect : conflating intent and foresight -- 4.5. Distinguishing suicide, assisted suicide, and euthanasia from the right to refuse : intending versus foreseeing death -- 4.6. Some (additional) criticisms of double effect as applied to the assisted suicide debate -- 4.7. Conclusion --
    5. Casey and Cruzan : do they intimate a right to assisted suicide and euthanasia? -- 5.1. The "reasoned judgment" test and its critics -- 5.2. Casey-based arguments -- 5.3. Cruzan-based arguments -- 5.4. Conclusion -- 6. Autonomy theory's implications for the debate over assisted suicide and euthanasia -- 6.1. The autonomy debate -- 6.2. The neutralist view of autonomy -- 6.3. The harm principle's competing view -- 6.4. Perfectionism and autonomy -- 6.5. The implications of autonomy theory for the assisted suicide and euthanasia debate -- 7. Legalization and the law of unintended consequences : utilitarian arguments for legalization -- 7.1. The Dutch experience : "virtually abuse-free"? -- 7.2. The Oregon experience : an "all-too conscientious" statutory regime? -- 7.3. Legalization and other unintended consequences -- 7.4. Decriminalization as a "costless" enterprise? -- 7.5. How to "balance" the costs and benefits of legalization? -- 7.6. Conclusion --
    8. Two test cases : Posner and Epstein -- 8.1. Posner's utilitarian case for assisted suicide -- 8.2. Posner's and Epstein's libertarian case for assisted suicide -- 9. An argument against legalization -- 9.1. The Inviolability of human life -- 9.2. What does it mean to respect human life as a basic good? -- 9.3. Some objections -- 9.4. The future of the Oregon experiment? -- 10. Toward a consistent end-of-life ethic : the "right to refuse" care for competent and incompetent patients -- 10.1. The inviolability of life and the "right to refuse" for competent persons -- 10.2. The "right to refuse" and infant patients -- 10.3. The "right to refuse" and incompetent adult patients -- 10.4. Conclusions -- Epilogue -- Appendix A. Certain American statutory laws banning or disapproving of assisted suicide -- Appendix B. Statistical calculations.
    The Glucksberg and quill controversies : the judiciary's (non)resolution of the assisted suicide debate. The Washington due process litigation -- The New York equal protection litigation -- The final battle? : the Supreme Court does (and does not) decide -- The aftermath of Glucksberg and Quill -- The debate over history. Which history? -- The project -- The ancients -- Early Christian history -- English common law -- Colonial American experience -- The modern consensus on suicide and its assistance -- The euthanasia movement -- Prevailing law today -- Conclusion -- Arguments from fairness and equal protection : if a right to refuse, then a right to assisted suicide? An act /omission distinction? -- A causation-based distinction? -- Toward an intent-based distinction : the insight of the double effect principle -- Some (initial) arguments against double effect : conflating intent and foresight -- Distinguishing suicide, assisted suicide, and euthanasia from the right to refuse : intending versus foreseeing death -- Some (additional) criticisms of double effect as applied to the assisted suicide debate -- Conclusion --
    Casey and Cruzan : do they intimate a right to assisted suicide and euthanasia? The "reasoned judgment" test and its critics -- Casey-based arguments -- Cruzan-based arguments -- Conclusion -- Autonomy theory's implications for the debate over assisted suicide and euthanasia. The autonomy debate -- The neutralist view of autonomy -- The harm principle's competing view -- Perfectionism and autonomy -- The implications of autonomy theory for the assisted suicide and euthanasia debate -- Legalization and the law of unintended consequences : utilitarian arguments for legalization. The Dutch experience : "virtually abuse-free"? -- The Oregon experience : an "all-too conscientious" statutory regime? -- Legalization and other unintended consequences -- Decriminalization as a "costless" enterprise? -- How to "balance" the costs and benefits of legalization? -- Conclusion --
    Two test cases : Posner and Epstein. Posner's utilitarian case for assisted suicide -- Posner's and Epstein's libertarian case for assisted suicide -- An argument against legalization. The Inviolability of human life -- What does it mean to respect human life as a basic good? -- Some objections -- The future of the Oregon experiment? -- Toward a consistent end-of-life ethic : the "right to refuse" care for competent and incompetent patients. The inviolability of life and the "right to refuse" for competent persons -- The "right to refuse" and infant patients -- The "right to refuse" and incompetent adult patients -- Conclusions -- Epilogue -- Appendix A. Certain American statutory laws banning or disapproving of assisted suicide -- Appendix B. Statistical calculations.
  • Local Note: acq2007eth
  • Publication Date: c2006
  • Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press
  • Format: ix, 311 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Identifier: ISBN 0691124582 (cloth : alk. paper);ISBN 9780691124582 (cloth : alk. paper)
  • Subjects: Assisted suicide -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States; Assisted suicide -- Law and legislation -- United States; Euthanasia -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States; Euthanasia -- Law and legislation -- United States; Suicide, Assisted -- ethics -- United States; Euthanasia -- ethics -- United States; Euthanasia -- legislation & jurisprudence -- United States; Suicide, Assisted -- legislation & jurisprudence -- United States; Euthanasia; Right to Die; Euthanasia, Active; Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary; Right to Die; Suicide, Assisted; Bioethical Issues; Homicide; Medical ethics; Assisted suicide; Right to die; Suicide; EuthanasiaAssisted suicide Moral and ethical aspects United States.Assisted suicide Law and legislation United StatesEuthanasia Moral and ethical aspects United States.Euthanasia Law and legislation United States.Assisted death (Euthanasia)Assisted dying (Euthanasia)Death, Assisted (Euthanasia)Death, MercyDying, Assisted (Euthanasia)Killing, MercyMercy deathMercy killingHomicideMedical ethicsAssisted suicideRight to dieAssisted death (Assisted suicide)Assisted dying (Assisted suicide)Death, Assisted (Assisted suicide)Doctor-assisted suicideDying, Assisted (Assisted suicide)Patient-directed deathPatient-directed dyingPhysician-assisted suicideSuicideEuthanasia
  • Language: English
  • Source: 01DAL UDM ALMA

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